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SRK dedicates a special video for his fans

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Feb
12

Padmaavat Movie Review, Box Office Collection, Story, Trailer, Cast Crew

Apple’s Core iOS Source Code Leaked on GitHub, Could Reinvigorate Jailbreaking

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Feb
12

iPhone-X

Apple is notorious for keeping its source code close to its chest, but someone just leaked a heap of very sensitive code online. A user known as “q3hardcore” posted large segments of Apple’s secure iBoot code to GitHub. The company issued a DMCA takedown request, but the code is out there in the wild now. This could lead to new attacks and vulnerabilities for iOS, but jailbreaking might also come back.

The iBoot framework is a low-level piece of software on all Apple hardware running iOS — on other devices, you’d call this the bootloader or the BIOS. It’s the first thing that starts up when the phone is turned on, because it loads the kernel and verifies that it was signed by Apple. Attempting to boot a modified kernel will immediately throw up a red flag in iBoot. Apple considers this code so integral to its security model that it offers a $200,000 bug bounty for vulnerabilities.

This code is from iOS 9, circa 2014. However, security researchers suspect that much of the code is still active in iOS 10. A handful of key files are missing, so it cannot be compiled. However, security researcher Jonathan Levin confirms the code is the real deal as it matches some iBoot code he himself has reverse engineered. Apple’s quick DMCA filing also strongly suggests the leak is real.

Flaws in older versions of iBoot have been leveraged by hackers to compromise the iPhone’s security, but users have also relied on the vulnerabilities for jailbreaking. That’s the equivalent of getting root access on an Android phone. Apple’s use of the Secure Enclave processor in newer iPhones has effectively killed the jailbreaking community. It takes a lot of time and expertise to uncover vulnerabilities, and they’re highly prized by security firms. These days, modders are more likely to sell the exploit than release it for free to the jailbreak community. This source code leak could change all that, though.

Security researchers and jailbreak developers are no doubt pouring over the iBoot code. Levin suggests that so-called “tethered” jailbreaks that require connecting the phone to a computer could become a reality again soon. These relatively simple jailbreaks have been blocked for several years by the Secure Enclave. However, it’s important to remember these jailbreaks are security holes that someone could use to steal data or damage your device. Apple is probably going to be working overtime for the foreseeable future to deal with the fallout from this leak.

Whats Popular Today Sun 11 Feb

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Feb
11

Luke Rockhold, New England Patriots owner, Red Gerard, …

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Shakib ‘unlikely’ for T20I series against Sri Lanka

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Feb
11

6:53 AM ET

Bangladesh’s T20I plans were further dented when their captain Shakib Al Hasan said his finger injury hasn’t fully healed. On Saturday, Shakib was named in the 15-man squad announced for the first T20 against Sri Lanka, on February 15.

“There is still no official statement regarding this issue but the doctor has told me that the injury will take another two weeks to heal. So, if that is the case then maybe it is unlikely that I will play in the T20 series,” he said.

The Bangladesh Cricket Board has not made an announcement of his unavailability.

Shakib injured his finger during the tri-series final on January 27, which ruled him out of the subsequent Tests against Sri Lanka. It would have been his first series in his second stint as the Test captain.

Bangladesh’s T20I squad includes five uncapped cricketers who impressed during the 2017 BPL.

Four killed as militants attack camp in Jammu and Kashmir: army

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Feb
11

SRINAGAR, India (Reuters) – Militants stormed an Indian army camp early on Saturday in the country’s northern Jammu and Kashmir state, killing two army personnel and wounding nine people, an army spokesman said.

Two militants had also been killed as of Saturday evening – the men wore fatigues and carried assault rifles, a large amount of ammunition and hand grenades – said the spokesman, Lt. Col. Devender Anand.

Among the wounded were five women and children, he said.

The site was cordoned off and surrounded by police and army units called in as reinforcements. Efforts to clear the camp were ongoing, Anand said. ”The operations will continue till all terrorists are apprehended or killed”, he said.

S.D. Singh Jamwal, the inspector general of police in Jammu, said that at about 4:55 a.m., a guard noticed suspicious movement before gunfire on his bunker.

“The fire was retaliated. The number of militants isn’t known,” he said.

India accuses Pakistan of training and arming militants and helping them infiltrate across the Line of Control that divides the Kashmir region. Pakistan denies the allegations.

The South Asian neighbours have fought two of their three wars since independence in 1947 over Muslim-majority Kashmir, which they both claim in full but rule in part.

Reporting by Fayaz Bukhari in Srinagar; Editing by Tom Lasseter, Richard Borsuk and Dale Hudson

Farah’s nostalgic note over triplets turning 10

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Feb
11

It’s been a long time since we saw actor Imran Khan on the big screen. However, it seems like the actor is in no rush to make his film comeback, especially as he seems to be enjoying his time with his family.

Recently, Imran’s wife Avantika took to Instagram to share an adorable throwback picture of the actor with their daughter Imara where he is seen planting a kiss on her chubby cheeks. In the caption, Avantika expressed herself with a quote by the poet Hermann Hesse, which read, “If I know what love is, it is because of you.” -Herman Hesse #randommondaygratitude (p.s-where the hell does time go?)”

Imran and Avantika got hitched in January 2011 and were blessed with a baby girl in June 2014.

On the work front, he was last seen in Nikhil Advani’s ‘Katti Batti’ co-starring Kangana Ranaut.

How a Low-Level Apple Employee Leaked Some of the iPhone’s Most Sensitive Code

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Feb
11

On Wednesday, an anonymous person published the proprietary source code of a core and fundamental component of the iPhone’s operating system.

A user named “ZioShiba” posted the closed source code for iBoot—the part of iOS responsible for ensuring a trusted boot of the operating system—to GitHub, the internet’s largest repository of open source code.

Jonathan Levin, an iPhone researcher, called it the “biggest leak” in the history of the iPhone. The iBoot code is for iOS 9 and the code is two-years old. But even today, it could help iOS security researchers and the jailbreak community find new bugs and vulnerabilities in a key part of the iPhone’s locked-down ecosystem.

“He pulled everything, all sorts of Apple internal tools and whatnot.”

The leak of the iBoot source code is not a security risk for most—if any—users, as Apple said in a statement. But it’s an embarrassment for a company that prides itself in secrecy and aggressively goes after leaks and leakers.

How does something like this happen?

A low-level Apple employee with friends in the jailbreaking community took code from Apple while working at the company’s Cupertino headquarters in 2016, according to two people who originally received the code from the employee. Motherboard has corroborated these accounts with text messages and screenshots from the time of the original leak and has also spoken to a third source familiar with the story.

Motherboard has granted these sources anonymity given the likelihood of Apple going after them for obtaining and distributing proprietary, copyrighted software. The original Apple employee did not respond to our request for comment and said through his friend that he did not currently want to talk about it because he signed a non-disclosure agreement with Apple.

According to these sources, the person who stole the code didn’t have an axe to grind with Apple. Instead, while working at Apple, friends of the employee encouraged the worker to leak internal Apple code. Those friends were in the jailbreaking community and wanted the source code for their security research.

The person took the iBoot source code—and additional code that has yet to be widely leaked—and shared it with a small group of five people.

“He pulled everything, all sorts of Apple internal tools and whatnot,” a friend of the intern told me. Motherboard saw screenshots of additional source code and file names that were not included in the GitHub leak and were dated from around the time of this first leak.

Got a tip? You can contact this reporter securely on Signal at +1 917 257 1382, OTR chat at lorenzo@jabber.ccc.de, or email lorenzo@motherboard.tv

According to two people who were in that original group, they hadn’t planned on the code ever leaving that circle of friends; a third friend who didn’t want the code but saw it on a friend’s computer also confirmed this account.

Eventually, however, the code was shared more widely and the original group of people lost control of its dissemination.

“I was really paranoid about it getting leaked immediately by one of us,” one of the original people to receive the code told me. “Having the iBoot source code and not being inside Apple…that’s unheard of.”

“I personally never wanted that code to see the light of day. Not out of greed but because of fear of the legal firestorm that would ensue,” they said. “The Apple internal community is really full of curious kids and teens. I knew one day that if those kids got it they’d be dumb enough to push it to GitHub.”

According to the source, if the code had been spread around too much, it could have helped less well-intentioned people create exploits and malicious jailbreaks to attack iPhone users.

“It can be weaponized,” they said. “There’s something to be said for the freedom of information, many view this leak to be good. [But] information isn’t free when it inherently violates personal security.”

“We did our damnedest best to try to make sure that it got leaked [only after the code] got old,” they added.

Around a year after the code was stolen and circulated among the small group of friends, someone inside that group gave it “to someone else who shouldn’t have had it,” one of our sources said.

“None of this was ever supposed to leave a handful of people, what’s happened is quite disastrous.”

At that point, the story gets murky. No one I spoke to is exactly sure who leaked it outside of the first tight-knit group of friends. And no one knew exactly what happened next. But everyone I spoke to agrees that at some point they lost control of the code and it slowly spread further and further. Motherboard confirmed that this particular source code began circulating more widely in 2017 with a fourth and fifth source who are familiar with the jailbreaking and iPhone research communities.

Then in the fall of 2017, people far-removed from that initial group of friends started sharing screenshots of the code in a Discord group of jailbreakers as a way to brag and tease other members of the group, according to one of the people I spoke to.

“When I heard about that Discord group, I burned all the copies of iBoot that I had,” they said. “I don’t need it anymore, and if this is going public I don’t want to be part of leaking it. If it gets out there it gets out there but it is not coming from me.”

At that point, however, it was too late. Soon after, someone with a throwaway Reddit account named “apple_internals” posted a link to a Mega archive with the iBoot source code on r/jailbreak.

Still, very few noticed because the post got automatically removed by a moderator bot. But then Wednesday, it was posted again to GitHub.

Both of our sources say they believe that someone not associated with the original leak ultimately posted it on GitHub: “What leaked yesterday isn’t even the full leak really. It’s not the original leak—it’s a copy,” one of them said.

At that point, it went viral, first inside the jailbreak community, then within the larger iOS security research community. Within hours, infosec Twitter was talking about it, and then we (and the rest of the tech press) wrote about it.

Apple declined to answer questions on whether the company knew about the leak before Wednesday, and whether they are investigating.

“By design the security of our products doesn’t depend on the secrecy of our source code. There are many layers of hardware and software protections built into our products,” the company said in an emailed statement.

On Wednesday, an Apple employee told me they knew of the leak before it was posted on GitHub, but didn’t say when the company learned the code was stolen.

“None of this was ever supposed to leave a handful of people, what’s happened is quite disastrous,” one of the people who originally received the code told me. “It’s obviously ended up being a clusterfuck, but the original intentions were non malicious.”

Clarification: One line in this post has been changed for clarity because the original phrasing was ambiguous. Apple did not encourage the employee to leak source code; the employee’s friends did.

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Whats Popular Today Sat 10 Feb

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Feb
10

John Gavin, National Pizza Day, Peter Rabbit, Lindsey Vonn, …

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Mackin, Kelly share 10 wickets to set up WA win

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Feb
10

Western Australia 215 (Cartwright 78, Stobo 3-32, Copeland 3-42, Lyon 3-59) and 6 for 172 (S Marsh 39) beat New South Wales 204 (Hughes 49, M Marsh 4-50) and 179 (Cowan 55, Mackin 6-43, Kelly 4-25) by four wickets

Thirteen wickets fell on the third day at the WACA Ground where the hosts prevailed by chasing down 169 and grabbed 7.15 points against New South Wales. Western Australia’s win was set up by the pace-bowling duo of Matthew Kelly and Simon Mackin who shared all 10 wickets between them. They bowled NSW out for 179 before Western Australia scored at nearly five an over to chase the total.

When NSW resumed on their overnight 3 for 77, Kelly struck on the second ball of the day and a little over six overs later again to reduce them to 5 for 89. Ed Cowan scored his 47th first-class fifty meanwhile, as Mackin ran through the tail to finish with 6 for 43 and Kelly ended with 4 for 25. It was Mackin’s first five-for in first-class matches this season and Kelly continued his wicket-taking streak after taking eight in the BBL for the Perth Scorchers.

Trent Copeland retired hurt at 5 for 90 when he was struck while batting by Jhye Richardson and returned to bat later at 9 for 175. He later bowled 9.3 overs with an injured arm.

Western Australia lost their openers by the 11th over before Hilton Cartwright (32) and Shaun Marsh (39) rallied them towards 100. Gurinder Sandhu had both of them caught but only 33 runs were left when Marsh walked back and the hosts finished the chase in the 35th over.

NSW are still on the top of the table followed by Western Australia but both will be overtaken by Queensland if they take the remaining four Tasmania wickets on Sunday.

Modi heads to Palestinian territories to balance warming ties with Israel

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Feb
10

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – After a public embrace of Israel as a strategic partner, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is heading to the Palestinian territories and the Gulf countries on Friday to bolster long-standing political and economic ties.

India was one of the earliest champions of the Palestinian cause but in recent years turned to Israel for high-tech military equipment and anti-terrorism cooperation.

Under Modi, whose nationalist party sees Israel as a natural ally against Islamist extremism, ties have flourished. Modi made the first trip to Israel by an Indian prime minister last year followed by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s visit to India last month.

But Indian officials said India continued to support the Palestinian cause and that Modi’s visit is aimed at helping build up the Palestinians’ capacity in the health, information technology and education areas.

“We have de-hyphenated our relations with Palestine and Israel and now we see them both as mutually independent and exclusive and as part of this policy the prime minister is undertaking this visit,” B. Bala Bhaskar, a joint secretary in the Indian foreign ministry, said.

The two sides are building a India-Palestinian technology park in Ramallah, the Palestinians’ seat of government, which will develop IT expertise and generate employment.

Modi is due to arrive in Jordan later on Friday and travel to Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, on Saturday. During his visit to Israel last year, he did not travel to the Palestinian headquarters as is usually the case with visiting leaders.

“Looking forward to my discussions with President Mahmoud Abbas and reaffirming our support for the Palestinian people and the development of Palestine,” Modi said in a Twitter post.

India was among more than 120 countries to vote in favour of a resolution in December calling for the United States to drop its recent recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

But the scale of India’s security and commercial ties with Israel dwarfs the engagement with the Palestinians. Israel is among India’s top three arms suppliers, doing business worth millions of dollars each year.

Modi and Netanyahu are now pushing for cooperation in agriculture, energy and cybersecurity in addition to defence.

Modi will also travel to the United Arab Emirates, from where India gets half of its oil, and to Oman, with which India’s navy has built close security ties.

The Gulf is home to nine million Indians who remit $35 billion home each year, sustaining millions of families. The UAE committed an investment of $75 billion in India when Modi visited in 2015 and the two sides will be looking to advance that goal, the foreign ministry said.

Reporting by Sanjeev Miglani; Editing by Nick Macfie

Beach song for Salman, Jacqueline in ‘Race 3’

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Feb
10

Salman Khan and Jacqueline Fernandez are all to set the screen on fire with their sizzling chemistry in a romantic beach song in ‘Race 3’.

Recently director Remo D’Souza gave a glimpse of the crackling chemistry of the lead pair of the film marking the occasion of the Mumbai schedule wrap.

Just a sneak peek into it caused a roar amongst the audience raising their interest. Now the makers are all set to treat the audience with a beach song set in Pattaya, Bangkok.

The star cast Salman, Jacqueline, Daisy Shah and Saqib Saleem will be heading to the international destination for the upcoming schedule of the film, while Anil Kapoor will join the team for the UAE schedule in March.

The sizzling number scheduled to be shot on the beaches of Pattaya will be at par with the hot numbers ‘Jumme Ki Raat’ and ‘Hangover’ from ‘Kick’. Remo will be choreographing the song during a 20-day schedule, which will also include action sequences.

Confirming the details of the song, Producer Ramesh Taurani said, “Yes Salman and Jacqueline will be shooting a romantic number during the Bangkok schedule. We have shortlisted two songs and are yet to decide which one we will finally go with”.

Starring an ensemble cast of Salman, Jacqueline, Anil, Bobby Deol, Saquib Saleem and Daisy, the action thriller is undoubtedly one of the most awaited films.

‘Race 3’ will hit theatres on Eid 2018.

Apple’s Core iOS Source Code Leaked on GitHub, Could Reinvigorate Jailbreaking

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Feb
10

iPhone-X

Apple is notorious for keeping its source code close to its chest, but someone just leaked a heap of very sensitive code online. A user known as “q3hardcore” posted large segments of Apple’s secure iBoot code to GitHub. The company issued a DMCA takedown request, but the code is out there in the wild now. This could lead to new attacks and vulnerabilities for iOS, but jailbreaking might also come back.

The iBoot framework is a low-level piece of software on all Apple hardware running iOS — on other devices, you’d call this the bootloader or the BIOS. It’s the first thing that starts up when the phone is turned on, because it loads the kernel and verifies that it was signed by Apple. Attempting to boot a modified kernel will immediately throw up a red flag in iBoot. Apple considers this code so integral to its security model that it offers a $200,000 bug bounty for vulnerabilities.

This code is from iOS 9, circa 2014. However, security researchers suspect that much of the code is still active in iOS 10. A handful of key files are missing, so it cannot be compiled. However, security researcher Jonathan Levin confirms the code is the real deal as it matches some iBoot code he himself has reverse engineered. Apple’s quick DMCA filing also strongly suggests the leak is real.

Flaws in older versions of iBoot have been leveraged by hackers to compromise the iPhone’s security, but users have also relied on the vulnerabilities for jailbreaking. That’s the equivalent of getting root access on an Android phone. Apple’s use of the Secure Enclave processor in newer iPhones has effectively killed the jailbreaking community. It takes a lot of time and expertise to uncover vulnerabilities, and they’re highly prized by security firms. These days, modders are more likely to sell the exploit than release it for free to the jailbreak community. This source code leak could change all that, though.

Security researchers and jailbreak developers are no doubt pouring over the iBoot code. Levin suggests that so-called “tethered” jailbreaks that require connecting the phone to a computer could become a reality again soon. These relatively simple jailbreaks have been blocked for several years by the Secure Enclave. However, it’s important to remember these jailbreaks are security holes that someone could use to steal data or damage your device. Apple is probably going to be working overtime for the foreseeable future to deal with the fallout from this leak.

Whats Popular Today Fri 9 Feb

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Feb
9

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South Africa buoyed by de Villiers’ return on ‘special occasion’

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Feb
9

Apart from the New Year’s Test, which was delayed this year, the pink ODI is the biggest occasion in South Africa’s cricket calendar. A sold-out Bullring turns up primarily in pink to increase awareness for a cause. For the six pink ODIs to date, someone from South Africa has stood up with a special performance. AB de Villiers did so against West Indies in 2015, scoring the fastest ODI century. He is finally back for South Africa after a three-match layoff because of injury. South Africa are banking on a mix of the return of a special player and a special occasion to galvanise them into giving a special performance to keep the series alive.

“Jeepers, AB is AB,” Chris Morris said when asked of the implications of de Villiers’ return. “Apart from what he brings on the field, it’s what he brings off the field. He brings that calmness, he brings that experience. To have a world-class player come back and play for South Africa is a special, special occasion. It’s a special moment for me, for me I quite enjoy sharing the field with him. It’s a special occasion every time I walk on to the field with AB because to me he is – if not the best – one of the best players in the world and one of the best players to ever play for South Africa. But to the team, he brings so much more than runs, he brings AB de Villiers. The AB de Villiers factor, let’s put it that way.”

South Africa’s big problem in the series has been their inability to play spin. India’s two wristspinners – Kuldeep Yadav and Yuzvendra Chahal – have taken 21 wickets between them in three matches at an average of 9, an economy rate of 3.63 and a strike rate of a wicket every 15 balls.

JP Duminy admitted after the loss in Cape Town that the batsmen are not picking the wristspinners out of the hand, and are also struggling against the pace and lengths they have been bowling. Morris hopes the batsmen will set it right with the video work they have been doing, but also believes the return of de Villiers will also bring knowledge on how to face them.

“Look AB has always got inputs; doesn’t matter if it’s spin, seam, behind the back,” Morris said. “It doesn’t matter what inputs he’s got, it’s always good. I’m sure AB will have a few pointers for the guys on how to handle spin and how to play spin, maybe a few different attacking options but like I said, it doesn’t matter what advice because he’s got advice for everything and it’s always solid. When AB talks, you listen because it’s always helpful.”

Coming back with such messiah-like expectations can be difficult for de Villiers. “At the moment we are all under pressure, put it that way,” Morris said when asked if there would be extra pressure on de Villiers. “We are 3-0 down in the series; what more pressure do you need? If AB is coming in, I don’t think he is feeling any added pressure. He is just going to come in and be AB de Villiers. I think AB de Villiers being AB de Villiers is a very dangerous player.

“It’s exciting to see how he’s going to come out tomorrow but there’s no added pressure. Every single guy in the team is feeling pressure. We know we’ve under performed, we know the way we’ve lost hasn’t been good. I think we are all dying to put on a good performance tomorrow, and to show that we can really play this game and what we are capable of.”

Like India took heart from their unbeaten record in Tests at Wanderers before they won the third Test, Morris looks at their pink-day record with optimism. “I keep harping on how special an occasion it is,” Morris said. “It’s really good. My first pink day, we saw I got some runs, won the game. Last year Dwaine Pretorious came in and got a four-fer and won the game for us as well. So you know it’s a special time, I think … I always joke about that … when people go and play at Lord’s, they put on special performances because you are playing at the home of cricket. Tomorrow is such a massive day for South Africa. People arrive for the occasion and they turn it on for the occasion. We have had a good run in the last couple of years for the pink day, and hopefully we can do the same tomorrow but would be quite nice to see a youngster put his hand up tomorrow and win the game for us tomorrow.”

Special Report

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Feb
9

INN DIN, Myanmar (Reuters) – Bound together, the 10 Rohingya Muslim captives watched their Buddhist neighbors dig a shallow grave. Soon afterwards, on the morning of Sept. 2, all 10 lay dead. At least two were hacked to death by Buddhist villagers. The rest were shot by Myanmar troops, two of the gravediggers said.

“One grave for 10 people,” said Soe Chay, 55, a retired soldier from Inn Din’s Rakhine Buddhist community who said he helped dig the pit and saw the killings. The soldiers shot each man two or three times, he said. “When they were being buried, some were still making noises. Others were already dead.”

The killings in the coastal village of Inn Din marked another bloody episode in the ethnic violence sweeping northern Rakhine state, on Myanmar’s western fringe. Nearly 690,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled their villages and crossed the border into Bangladesh since August. None of Inn Din’s 6,000 Rohingya remained in the village as of October.

The Rohingya accuse the army of arson, rapes and killings aimed at rubbing them out of existence in this mainly Buddhist nation of 53 million. The United Nations has said the army may have committed genocide; the United States has called the action ethnic cleansing. Myanmar says its “clearance operation” is a legitimate response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents.

Rohingya trace their presence in Rakhine back centuries. But most Burmese consider them to be unwanted immigrants from Bangladesh; the army refers to the Rohingya as “Bengalis.” In recent years, sectarian tensions have risen and the government has confined more than 100,000 Rohingya in camps where they have limited access to food, medicine and education.

Reuters has pieced together what happened in Inn Din in the days leading up to the killing of the 10 Rohingya – eight men and two high school students in their late teens.

Until now, accounts of the violence against the Rohingya in Rakhine state have been provided only by its victims. The Reuters reconstruction draws for the first time on interviews with Buddhist villagers who confessed to torching Rohingya homes, burying bodies and killing Muslims.

This account also marks the first time soldiers and paramilitary police have been implicated by testimony from security personnel themselves. Members of the paramilitary police gave Reuters insider descriptions of the operation to drive out the Rohingya from Inn Din, confirming that the military played the lead role in the campaign.

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM A MASSACRE

The slain men’s families, now sheltering in Bangladesh refugee camps, identified the victims through photographs shown to them by Reuters. The dead men were fishermen, shopkeepers, the two teenage students and an Islamic teacher.

Three photographs, provided to Reuters by a Buddhist village elder, capture key moments in the massacre at Inn Din, from the Rohingya men’s detention by soldiers in the early evening of Sept. 1 to their execution shortly after 10 a.m. on Sept. 2. Two photos – one taken the first day, the other on the day of the killings – show the 10 captives lined up in a row, kneeling. The final photograph shows the men’s bloodied bodies piled in the shallow grave.

The Reuters investigation of the Inn Din massacre was what prompted Myanmar police authorities to arrest two of the news agency’s reporters. The reporters, Burmese citizens Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, were detained on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents relating to Rakhine.

Then, on Jan. 10, the military issued a statement that confirmed portions of what Wa Lone, Kyaw Soe Oo and their colleagues were preparing to report, acknowledging that 10 Rohingya men were massacred in the village. It confirmed that Buddhist villagers attacked some of the men with swords and soldiers shot the others dead.

The statement coincided with an application to the court by prosecutors to charge Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo under Myanmar’s Official Secrets Act, which dates back to the time of colonial British rule. The charges carry a maximum 14-year prison sentence.

But the military’s version of events is contradicted in important respects by accounts given to Reuters by Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya Muslim witnesses. The military said the 10 men belonged to a group of 200 “terrorists” that attacked security forces. Soldiers decided to kill the men, the army said, because intense fighting in the area made it impossible to transfer them to police custody. The army said it would take action against those involved.

Buddhist villagers interviewed for this article reported no attack by a large number of insurgents on security forces in Inn Din. And Rohingya witnesses told Reuters that soldiers plucked the 10 from among hundreds of men, women and children who had sought safety on a nearby beach.

Scores of interviews with Rakhine Buddhist villagers, soldiers, paramilitary police, Rohingya Muslims and local administrators further revealed:

– The military and paramilitary police organized Buddhist residents of Inn Din and at least two other villages to torch Rohingya homes, more than a dozen Buddhist villagers said. Eleven Buddhist villagers said Buddhists committed acts of violence, including killings. The government and army have repeatedly blamed Rohingya insurgents for burning villages and homes.

– An order to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets was passed down the command chain from the military, said three paramilitary police officers speaking on condition of anonymity and a fourth police officer at an intelligence unit in the regional capital Sittwe. Security forces wore civilian clothes to avoid detection during raids, one of the paramilitary police officers said.

– Some members of the paramilitary police looted Rohingya property, including cows and motorcycles, in order to sell it, according to village administrator Maung Thein Chay and one of the paramilitary police officers.

– Operations in Inn Din were led by the army’s 33rd Light Infantry Division, supported by the paramilitary 8th Security Police Battalion, according to four police officers, all of them members of the battalion.

POTENTIAL CRIMINAL CASES

Michael G. Karnavas, a U.S. lawyer based in The Hague who has worked on cases at international criminal tribunals, said evidence that the military had organized Buddhist civilians to commit violence against Rohingya “would be the closest thing to a smoking gun in establishing not just intent, but even specific genocidal intent, since the attacks seem designed to destroy the Rohingya or at least a significant part of them.”

Evidence of the execution of men in government custody also could be used to build a case of crimes against humanity against military commanders, Karnavas said, if it could be shown that it was part of a “widespread or systematic” campaign targeting the Rohingya population.

Kevin Jon Heller, a University of London law professor who served as a legal associate for convicted war criminal and former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, said an order to clear villages by military command was “unequivocally the crime against humanity of forcible transfer.”

In December, the United States imposed sanctions on the army officer who had been in charge of Western Command troops in Rakhine, Major General Maung Maung Soe. So far, however, Myanmar has not faced international sanctions over the violence.

Myanmar’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has disappointed many former supporters in the West by not speaking out against the army’s actions. They had hoped the election of her National League for Democracy party in 2015 would bring democratic reform and an opening of the country. Instead, critics say, Suu Kyi is in thrall to the generals who freed her from house arrest in 2010.

Asked about the evidence Reuters has uncovered about the massacre, government spokesman Zaw Htay said, “We are not denying the allegations about violations of human rights. And we are not giving blanket denials.” If there was “strong and reliable primary evidence” of abuses, the government would investigate, he said. “And then if we found the evidence is true and the violations are there, we will take the necessary action according to our existing law.”

When told that paramilitary police officers had said they received orders to “clear” Inn Din’s Rohingya hamlets, he replied, “We have to verify. We have to ask the Ministry of Home Affairs and Myanmar police forces.” Asked about the allegations of looting by paramilitary police officers, he said the police would investigate.

He expressed surprise when told that Buddhist villagers had confessed to burning Rohingya homes, then added, “We recognize that many, many different allegations are there, but we need to verify who did it. It is very difficult in the current situation.”

Zaw Htay defended the military operation in Rakhine. “The international community needs to understand who did the first terrorist attacks. If that kind of terrorist attack took place in European countries, in the United States, in London, New York, Washington, what would the media say?”

NEIGHBOR TURNS ON NEIGHBOR

Inn Din lies between the Mayu mountain range and the Bay of Bengal, about 50 km (30 miles) north of Rakhine’s state capital Sittwe. The settlement is made up of a scattering of hamlets around a school, clinic and Buddhist monastery. Buddhist homes cluster in the northern part of the village. For many years there had been tensions between the Buddhists and their Muslim neighbors, who accounted for almost 90 percent of the roughly 7,000 people in the village. But the two communities had managed to co-exist, fishing the coastal waters and cultivating rice in the paddies.

In October 2016, Rohingya militants attacked three police posts in northern Rakhine – the beginning of a new insurgency. After the attacks, Rohingya in Inn Din said many Buddhists stopped hiring them as farmhands and home help. The Buddhists said the Rohingya stopped showing up for work.

On Aug. 25 last year, the rebels struck again, hitting 30 police posts and an army base. The closest attack was just 4 km to the north. In Inn Din, several hundred fearful Buddhists took refuge in the monastery in the center of the village, more than a dozen of their number said. Inn Din’s Buddhist night watchman San Thein, 36, said Buddhist villagers feared being “swallowed up” by their Muslim neighbors. A Buddhist elder said all Rohingya, “including children,” were part of the insurgency and therefore “terrorists.”

On Aug. 27, about 80 troops from Myanmar’s 33rd Light Infantry Division arrived in Inn Din, nine Buddhist villagers said. Two paramilitary police officers and Soe Chay, the retired soldier, said the troops belonged to the 11th infantry regiment of this division. The army officer in charge told villagers they must cook for the soldiers and act as lookouts at night, Soe Chay said. The officer promised his troops would protect Buddhist villagers from their Rohingya neighbors. Five Buddhist villagers said the officer told them they could volunteer to join security operations. Young volunteers would need their parents’ permission to join the troops, however.

The army found willing participants among Inn Din’s Buddhist “security group,” nine members of the organization and two other villagers said. This informal militia was formed after violence broke out in 2012 between Rakhine’s Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims, sparked by reports of the rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men. Myanmar media reported at the time that the three were sentenced to death by a district court.

Inn Din’s security group built watch huts around the Buddhist part of the village, and its members took turns to stand guard. Its ranks included Buddhist firefighters, school teachers, students and unemployed young men. They were useful to the military because they knew the local geography, said Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay.

Most of the group’s 80 to 100 men armed themselves with machetes and sticks. They also had a handful of guns, according to one member. Some wore green fatigue-style clothing they called “militia suits.”

ORGANIZING THE ARSON ATTACKS

In the days that followed the 33rd Light Infantry’s arrival, soldiers, police and Buddhist villagers burned most of the homes of Inn Din’s Rohingya Muslims, a dozen Buddhist residents said.

Two of the paramilitary police officers, both members of the 8th Security Police Battalion, said their battalion raided Rohingya hamlets with soldiers from the newly arrived 33rd Light Infantry. One of the police officers said he received verbal orders from his commander to “go and clear” areas where Rohingya lived, which he took to mean to burn them.

The second police officer described taking part in several raids on villages north of Inn Din. The raids involved at least 20 soldiers and between five and seven police, he said. A military captain or major led the soldiers, while a police captain oversaw the police team. The purpose of the raids was to deter the Rohingya from returning.

“If they have a place to live, if they have food to eat, they can carry out more attacks,” he said. “That’s why we burned their houses, mainly for security reasons.”

Soldiers and paramilitary police wore civilian shirts and shorts to blend in with the villagers, according to the second police officer and Inn Din’s Buddhist administrator, Maung Thein Chay. If the media identified the involvement of security personnel, the police officer explained, “we would have very big problems.”

A police spokesman, Colonel Myo Thu Soe, said he knew of no instances of security forces torching villages or wearing civilian clothing. Nor was there any order to “go and clear” or “set fire” to villages. “This is very much impossible,” he told Reuters. “If there are things like that, it should be reported officially, and it has to be investigated officially.”

“As you’ve told me about these matters now, we will scrutinize and check back,” he added. “What I want to say for now is that as for the security forces, there are orders and instructions and step-by-step management, and they have to follow them. So, I don’t think these things happened.”

The army did not respond to a request for comment.

A medical assistant at the Inn Din village clinic, Aung Myat Tun, 20, said he took part in several raids. “Muslim houses were easy to burn because of the thatched roofs. You just light the edge of the roof,” he said. “The village elders put monks’ robes on the end of sticks to make the torches and soaked them with kerosene. We couldn’t bring phones. The police said they will shoot and kill us if they see any of us taking photos.”

The night watchman San Thein, a leading member of the village security group, said troops first swept through the Muslim hamlets. Then, he said, the military sent in Buddhist villagers to burn the houses.

“We got the kerosene for free from the village market after the kalars ran away,” he said, using a Burmese slur for people from South Asia.

A Rakhine Buddhist youth said he thought he heard the sound of a child inside one Rohingya home that was burned. A second villager said he participated in burning a Rohingya home that was occupied.

“I STARTED HACKING HIM WITH A SWORD”

Soe Chay, the retired soldier who was to dig the grave for the 10 Rohingya men, said he participated in one killing. He told Reuters that troops discovered three Rohingya men and a woman hiding beside a haystack in Inn Din on Aug. 28. One of the men had a smartphone that could be used to take incriminating pictures.

The soldiers told Soe Chay to “do whatever you want to them,” he said. They pointed out the man with the phone and told him to stand up. “I started hacking him with a sword, and a soldier shot him when he fell down.”

Similar violence was playing out across a large part of northern Rakhine, dozens of Buddhist and Rohingya residents said.

Data from the U.N. Operational Satellite Applications Programme shows scores of Rohingya villages in Rakhine state burned in an area stretching 110 km. New York-based Human Rights Watch says more than 350 villages were torched over the three months from Aug. 25, according to an analysis of satellite imagery.

In the village of Laungdon, some 65 km north of Inn Din, Thar Nge, 38, said he was asked by police and local officials to join a Buddhist security group. “The army invited us to burn the kalar village at Hpaw Ti Kaung,” he said, adding that four villagers and nearly 20 soldiers and police were involved in the operation. “Police shot inside the village so all the villagers fled and then we set fire to it. Their village was burned because police believed the villagers supported Rohingya militants – that’s why they cleaned it with fire.”

A Buddhist student from Ta Man Tha village, 15 km north of Laungdon, said he too participated in the burning of Rohingya homes. An army officer sought 30 volunteers to burn “kalar” villages, said the student. Nearly 50 volunteered and gathered fuel from motorbikes and from a market.

“They separated us into several groups. We were not allowed to enter the village directly. We had to surround it and approach the village that way. The army would shoot gunfire ahead of us and then the army asked us to enter,” he said.

After the Rohingya had fled Inn Din, Buddhist villagers took their property, including chickens and goats, Buddhist residents told Reuters. But the most valuable goods, mostly motorcycles and cattle, were collected by members of the 8th Security Police Battalion and sold, said the first police officer and Inn Din village administrator Maung Thein Chay. Maung Thein Chay said the commander of the 8th Battalion, Thant Zin Oo, struck a deal with Buddhist businessmen from other parts of Rakhine state and sold them cattle. The police officer said he had stolen four cows from Rohingya villagers, only for Thant Zin Oo to snatch them away.

Reached by phone, Thant Zin Oo did not comment. Colonel Myo Thu Soe, the police spokesman, said the police would investigate the allegations of looting.

THE VICTIMS ARE CHOSEN

By Sept. 1, several hundred Rohingya from Inn Din were sheltering at a makeshift camp on a nearby beach. They erected tarpaulin shelters to shield themselves from heavy rain.

Among this group were the 10 Rohingya men who would be killed the next morning. Reuters has identified all of the 10 by speaking to witnesses among Inn Din’s Buddhist community and Rohingya relatives and witnesses tracked down in refugee camps in Bangladesh.

Five of the men, Dil Mohammed, 35, Nur Mohammed, 29, Shoket Ullah, 35, Habizu, 40, and Shaker Ahmed, 45, were fishermen or fish sellers. The wealthiest of the group, Abul Hashim, 25, ran a store selling nets and machine parts to fishermen and farmers. Abdul Majid, a 45-year-old father of eight, ran a small shop selling areca nut wrapped in betel leaves, commonly chewed like tobacco. Abulu, 17, and Rashid Ahmed, 18, were high school students. Abdul Malik, 30, was an Islamic teacher.

According to the statement released by the army on Jan. 10, security forces had gone to a coastal area where they “were attacked by about 200 Bengalis with sticks and swords.” The statement said that “as the security forces opened fire into the sky, the Bengalis dispersed and ran away. Ten of them were arrested.”

Three Buddhist and more than a dozen Rohingya witnesses contradict this version of events. Their accounts differ from one another in some details. The Buddhists spoke of a confrontation between a small group of Rohingya men and some soldiers near the beach. But there is unanimity on a crucial point: None said the military had come under a large-scale attack in Inn Din.

Government spokesman Zaw Htay referred Reuters to the army’s statement of Jan. 10 and declined to elaborate further. The army did not respond to a request for comment.

The Rohingya witnesses, who were on or near the beach, said Islamic teacher Abdul Malik had gone back to his hamlet with his sons to collect food and bamboo for shelter. When he returned, a group of at least seven soldiers and armed Buddhist villagers were following him, these witnesses said. Abdul Malik walked towards the watching Rohingya Muslims unsteadily, with blood dripping from his head. Some witnesses said they had seen one of the armed men strike the back of Abdul Malik’s head with a knife.

Then the military beckoned with their guns to the crowd of roughly 300 Rohingya to assemble in the paddies, these witnesses said. The soldiers and the Rohingya, hailing from different parts of Myanmar, spoke different languages. Educated villagers translated for their fellow Rohingya.

“I could not hear much, but they pointed toward my husband and some other men to get up and come forward,” said Rehana Khatun, 22, the wife of Nur Mohammed, one of the 10 who were later slain. “We heard they wanted the men for a meeting. The military asked the rest of us to return to the beach.”

FRESH CLOTHES AND A LAST MEAL

Soldiers held and questioned the 10 men in a building at Inn Din’s school for a night, the military said. Rashid Ahmed and Abulu had studied there alongside Rakhine Buddhist students until the attacks by Rohingya rebels in October 2016. Schools were shut temporarily, disrupting the pair’s final year.

“I just remember him sitting there and studying, and it was always amazing to me because I am not educated,” said Rashid Ahmed’s father, farmer Abdu Shakur, 50. “I would look at him reading. He would be the first one in the family to be educated.”

A photograph, taken on the evening the men were detained, shows the two Rohingya students and the eight older men kneeling on a path beside the village clinic, most of them shirtless. They were stripped when first detained, a dozen Rohingya witnesses said. It isn’t clear why. That evening, Buddhist villagers said, the men were “treated” to a last meal of beef. They were provided with fresh clothing.

On Sept. 2, the men were taken to scrubland north of the village, near a graveyard for Buddhist residents, six Buddhist villagers said. The spot is backed by a hill crested with trees. There, on their knees, the 10 were photographed again and questioned by security personnel about the disappearance of a local Buddhist farmer named Maung Ni, according to a Rakhine elder who said he witnessed the interrogation.

Reuters was not able to establish what happened to Maung Ni. According to Buddhist neighbors, the farmer went missing after leaving home early on Aug. 25 to tend his cattle. Several Rakhine Buddhist and Rohingya villagers told Reuters they believed he had been killed, but they knew of no evidence connecting any of the 10 men to his disappearance. The army said in its Jan. 10 statement that “Bengali terrorists” had killed Maung Ni, but did not identify the perpetrators.

Two of the men pictured behind the Rohingya prisoners in the photograph taken on the morning of Sept. 2 belong to the 8th Security Police Battalion. Reuters confirmed the identities of the two men from their Facebook pages and by visiting them in person.

One of the two officers, Aung Min, a police recruit from Yangon, stands directly behind the captives. He looks at the camera as he holds a weapon. The other officer, police Captain Moe Yan Naing, is the figure on the top right. He walks with his rifle over his shoulder.

The day after the two Reuters reporters were arrested in December, Myanmar’s government also announced that Moe Yan Naing had been arrested and was being investigated under the 1923 Official Secrets Act.

Aung Min, who is not facing legal action, declined to speak to Reuters.

VENGEANCE FOR A MISSING FARMER

Three Buddhist youths said they watched from a hut as the 10 Rohingya captives were led up a hill by soldiers towards the site of their deaths.

One of the gravediggers, retired soldier Soe Chay, said Maung Ni’s sons were invited by the army officer in charge of the squad to strike the first blows.

The first son beheaded the Islamic teacher, Abdul Malik, according to Soe Chay. The second son hacked another of the men in the neck.

“After the brothers sliced them both with swords, the squad fired with guns. Two to three shots to one person,” said Soe Chay. A second gravedigger, who declined to be identified, confirmed that soldiers had shot some of the men.

In its Jan. 10 statement, the military said the two brothers and a third villager had “cut the Bengali terrorists” with swords and then, in the chaos, four members of the security forces had shot the captives. “Action will be taken against the villagers who participated in the case and the members of security forces who broke the Rules of Engagement under the law,” the statement said. It didn’t spell out those rules.

Tun Aye, one of the sons of Maung Ni, has been detained on murder charges, his lawyer said on Jan. 13. Contacted by Reuters on Feb. 8, the lawyer declined to comment further. Reuters was unable to reach the other brother.

In October, Inn Din locals pointed two Reuters reporters towards an area of brush behind the hill where they said the killings took place. The reporters discovered a newly cut trail leading to soft, recently disturbed earth littered with bones. Some of the bones were entangled with scraps of clothing and string that appeared to match the cord that is seen binding the captives’ wrists in the photographs. The immediate area was marked by the smell of death.

Reuters showed photographs of the site to three forensic experts: Homer Venters, director of programs at Physicians for Human Rights; Derrick Pounder, a pathologist who has consulted for Amnesty International and the United Nations; and Luis Fondebrider, president of the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team, who investigated the graves of those killed under Argentina’s military junta in the 1970s and 1980s. All observed human remains, including the thoracic part of a spinal column, ribs, scapula, femur and tibia. Pounder said he couldn’t rule out the presence of animal bones as well.

The Rakhine Buddhist elder provided Reuters reporters with a photograph which shows the aftermath of the execution. In it, the 10 Rohingya men are wearing the same clothing as in the previous photo and are tied to each other with the same yellow cord, piled into a small hole in the earth, blood pooling around them. Abdul Malik, the Islamic teacher, appears to have been beheaded. Abulu, the student, has a gaping wound in his neck. Both injuries appear consistent with Soe Chay’s account.

Forensic pathologist Fondebrider reviewed this picture. He said injuries visible on two of the bodies were consistent with “the action of a machete or something sharp that was applied on the throat.”

Some family members did not know for sure that the men had been killed until Reuters returned to their shelters in Bangladesh in January.

“I can’t explain what I feel inside. My husband is dead,” said Rehana Khatun, wife of Nur Mohammed. “My husband is gone forever. I don’t want anything else, but I want justice for his death.”

In Inn Din, the Buddhist elder explained why he chose to share evidence of the killings with Reuters. “I want to be transparent on this case. I don’t want it to happen like that in future.”

Reporting by Wa Lone, Kyaw Soe Oo, Simon Lewis and Antoni Slodkowski; editing by Janet McBride, Martin Howell and Alex Richardson.

Javed Akhtar comes out in support of Sonu

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Feb
9

Taapsee Pannu is known to be upfront and honest about her opinions and what she truly believes in. The actress has always been curt about what she disagrees with even if she’s the only one to take a stand. This is what makes her fans love her.

Recently, the ‘Judwaa 2’ actress addressed the most relevant issue- perils and power of social media. In a statement to IANS, she said, “I think with the power social media has given us, it is so easy to mock someone nowadays. What people don’t understand is that it can genuinely crush someone’s confidence. Just because a female does not walk by the conventional rules, people like to call her by different names which is highly upsetting.”

She also admitted that she’s been trolled by netizens too and it’s very humiliating to be disregarded like that despite achieving whatever one has. Also, such moments make her feel like she went for the wrong career choice.

iPhone Source Code Leaked On GitHub Making ‘iOS Jailbreak’ Far Easier

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Feb
9

A user has just posted iPhone source code on Github that could very well open up the operating system for hackers and security researchers to better make iPhone jailbreaks.

iPhone Source Code
Image Source: Apple.com (screenshot)

Apple has since issued a takedown notice, requiring the website to remove the offending files, but the iPhone source code – referred to as “iBoot” – is the part of the operating system that is responsible for ensuring a “trusted boot” of the operating system. In simpler terms, it’s the program that loads iOS, and having vulnerabilities exposed may crack the operating system wide open for hackers and other developers that are looking to fully unlock Apple’s very restrictive operating system.

The iPhone source code released says that it’s for iOS 9, which is quite outdated at this point, but there’s a large possibility that some of the vulnerabilities are still present in iOS 11 and can be exploited to make a fully-unlocked phone much easier to achieve.

As a developer that desires complete control over their devices and operating systems, Apple has been quite hesitant to release the code that runs iOS to the public, although they have made some of the code available in recent years. However, the boot process iPhone source code contained in iBoot has remained private until recently. Bugs found in the Apple boot code are the most important to Apple, with the company offering a payment of up to $200000 for newly discovered vulnerabilities in this process, but the company is obviously not pleased with the incredibly sensitive code being published on GitHub for all to see.

Jonathan Levin, the author of a series of books on iOS and Mac OSX internals, told Motherboard in an online chat that “this is the biggest leak in history…It’s a huge deal.”

He continued on to suggest that the code appeared to be real iPhone source code because it aligned with the code he had reverse engineered himself. We currently don’t know who is behind the leak, and Apple declined Motherboard’s request for comment.

iPhone source code leak jailbreak

As mentioned above, Apple issued a DMCA notice demanding that the files be taken down as the iPhone source code is proprietary and private, containing Apple’s copyright notice. The fact that the company was so quick to issue this notice reinforces the fact that the source code is legitimate.

Levin states that the new leak regarding iBoot could pave the way for tethered jailbreaks that require the phone to be connected to a computer when booting. These types of jailbreaks used to be common on older versions of iOS, but as Apple has increased the security of their operating system with features such as the Secure Enclave Process chip, it’s been more and more difficult to unlock phones in this manner. While the iPhone source code has since been taken down, it was surely up long enough for hackers to get a copy and start taking advantage of any flaws in the boot process. As more jailbreaks come out that take advantage of these vulnerabilities, there’s a high probability that Apple will take all steps possible in order to keep their phones locked down. If past history is any indication, however, hackers will continue their quest to unlock the iPhone and give users full control over their devices.

Although this recent posting on GitHub is the most widely publicized leak of the documents, this actually isn’t the first time the iPhone source code has made an appearance. Last year, a Reddit user with the moniker “apple_internals” posted the same code on the jailbreak subreddit. Due to the user’s low amount of Reddit Karma and new account, the post was quickly buried. The fact that the code is available on GitHub and is making the rounds through media outlets across the web confirms that jailbreakers now have their hands on the information and are posing a real threat to the security of Apple’s operating system.

“iBoot is the one component Apple has been holding on to, still encrypting its 64 bit image…And now it’s wide open in source code form,” Levin continued.

While the release of the iPhone source code is no doubt a boon for the jailbreaking community, it’s a serious problem for Apple as they strive to keep their operating system locked down. It’s likely we’ll see some changes in the source code moving forward in order to address some of the damage that is now possible at the hands of enterprising hackers.

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Whats Popular Today Thu 8 Feb

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Feb
8

Gerber baby, Venom, Deadpool, Cheddar Man, …

  1. Gerber baby
  2. <a href="https://trends.google.co.in/trends/hottrends?pn=p1… [read more]

Feldman stars with bat and ball to boost Queensland

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Feb
8

Tasmania 2 for 60 (Bailey 19*, Feldman 1-13, Neser 1-19) trail Queensland 255 (Renshaw 56, Feldman 47, Bell 3-43, Rainbird 3-50) by 195 runs
Scorecard

Luke Feldman struck a career-best 47 off 41 balls at No. 11 and followed it with the wicket of Tasmania opener Alex Doolan to boost Queensland on day one of their Sheffield Shield match at the Gabba. Feldman hit five fours and a six and added 72 for the last wicket at a run rate of 5.40 with Mitchell Swepson to haul his side from 183 for 9 to 255. Seamers Gabe Bell and Sam Rainbird picked up three wickets each for Tasmania.

Tasmania then lost both their openers in 11 overs but captain George Bailey and Jake Doran closed the day without any further damage.

After having opted to bat, Queensland had a solid start with Matt Renshaw and debutant opener Lachlan Pfeffer adding 90 for the first wicket. Bell and Rainbird then ran through the middle and lower order with assistance from Simon Milenko and Thomas Rogers. Queensland were in danger of folding for a sub-200 score before Feldman intervened.

Sensex, Nifty gain over 1 percent after 7 days of falls

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Feb
8

(Reuters) – Indian shares rose more than 1 percent on Thursday after seven consecutive sessions of declines, as market heavyweights such as Infosys recovered and as drug maker Cipla gained on solid earnings.

The BSE Sensex and NSE Nifty shed nearly 6 percent each in the previous seven sessions, matching a losing streak of the same duration in September.

Thursday’s gains came even as Asian shares flirted with six-week lows. MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was little changed as U.S. bond yields crept up towards four-year highs.

Analysts said they expected global markets to stabilise, but said caution would remain in India amid continued worries that accelerating inflation would force the Reserve Bank of India to raise interest rates.

The RBI on Wednesday held rates steady and kept its policy stance at “neutral”, with analysts saying the central bank’s future action would depend on inflation.

“Market is into a trading zone with a broad-based recovery. The worst, as far as downside concerns and short-selling, is more or less done. But at the same time, the markets are not in clear waters yet with concerns over inflation,” said Dharmesh Kant, an independent market expert.

The broader Nifty was up 1.21 percent at 10,603.85 as of 0541 GMT, while the benchmark Sensex was 1.31 percent higher at 34,529.79.

Pharma and realty stocks gained with the Nifty Pharma index and the Nifty Realty index climbing over 2.5 percent each.

Shares of Cipla surged as much as 6.85 percent after the country’s fourth-largest drugmaker by revenue reported a 7 percent jump in quarterly profit on Wednesday.

IT service exporters Infosys and Tata Consultancy Services Ltd climbed over 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively.

Reporting by Vishal Sridhar in Bengaluru; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu

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